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Showing 21 - 30 of 2204 results

Zanubrutinib (formerly known as BGB-3111) was developed by BeiGene as a small-molecule inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). The drug forms a covalent bond with a cysteine residue in the BTK active site, leading to inhibition of BTK activity. BTK signaling results in activation of pathways necessary for B-cell proliferation, trafficking, chemotaxis, and adhesion, thus Zanubrutinib inhibits malignant B-cell proliferation and reduces tumor growth. Zanubrutinib was granted accelerated approval by the FDA in November 2019 based on clinical trial results that demonstrated an 84% overall response rate from zanubrutinib therapy in patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). On August 31, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved zanubrutinib for adult patients with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM).
Brilliant Blue G is triphenylmethane dye that was developed for use in the textile industry but is now commonly used for staining proteins in analytical biochemistry. The Bradford assay is a standard, rapid dye-binding assay that uses Brilliant Blue G to quantify the amount of protein in a solution. Brilliant Blue G also acts as a selective inhibitor of the P2X purinoceptor channel P2X7 (IC50s = 10.1 and 265 nM for rat and human P2X7, respectively). In mice, it inhibits interleukin-1β expression and reduces neurological injury secondary to traumatic brain injury. Brilliant Blue G was used to prepare the protein reagent for the determination of protein content of the collagenase enzyme isolated from fish waste. It may be employed as a stain for the internal limiting membrane (ILM) for the macular hole (MH) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)


Relebactum sodium (MK-7655) is a piperidine analog 3 that inhibits class A and C β-lactamases (in vitro). It is being investigated for use in treatment of infectious diseases, such as treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. Its potential as an alternative to existing medicines in the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections is being studied. Clinical trials have been conducted and are still ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of relebactum sodium in treatment of intra-abdominal infections, urinary tract infections (such as pyelonephritis), hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonias, and gram-negative bacterial infections.
Alpelisib (BYL719) is a PI3Kα-selective inhibitor. PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway is frequently activated in cancer, therefore investigational PI3K inhibitor alpelisib is considered to be effective as an anticancer agent and has been in clinical development by Novartis. Alpelisib have demonstrated activity in preclinical models of solid tumors and had favorable tolerability profiles, with the most common adverse events consistent with “on-target” inhibition of PI3K in early clinical studies. There are ongoing clinical trials of alpelisib in a range of cancer types, including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiforme. Combination therapy with other chemo therapeutics may be preferable.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)



Tafamidis meglumine (Vyndaqel®, Pfizer) is a novel, first-in-class drug for the treatment of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP), a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive sensory, motor and autonomic impairment that is ultimately fatal. Pathogenic mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) protein lead to destabilization of its tetrameric structure and subsequent formation of amyloid aggregates. Tafamidis is a small-molecule inhibitor that binds selectively to TTR in human plasma and kinetically stabilizes the tetrameric structure of both wild-type TTR and a number of different mutants. Clinical trials indicate that tafamidis slows disease progression in patients with TTR-FAP and reduces the burden of disease, demonstrating improvement in small and large nerve fiber function, modified body mass index and lower extremity neurological examination. Tafamidis meglumine has been launched for TTR FAP in the EU, Japan, Argentina, Malta and Mexico, and is preregistration in the US for this indication.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Afamelanotide (SCENESSE) is a synthetic α-melanocyte stimulating hormone analog and first-in-class melanocortin-1 receptor agonist that is approved in the EU for the prevention of phototoxicity in adults with erythropoietic protoporphyria. Afamelanotide differs from endogenous α-melanocyte stimulating hormone at the fourth and seventh amino acid residues, increasing its resistance to immediate degradation and increasing its binding time to melanocortin-1 receptor. Afamelanotide is mimic the pharmacological activity of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone by binding to the melanocortin-1 receptor on melanocytes and activating the synthesis of eumelanin. Eumelanin provides photoprotection through mechanisms including, but not limited to, the absorption and scattering of visible and UV light and antioxidant activity. Afamelanotide increases eumelanin density in healthy volunteers and patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria. In healthy, fair-skinned volunteers, a significant increase in melanin density and skin darkening in both sun-exposed and non-sun-exposed sites was seen with subcutaneous injections of afamelanotide. The most common afamelanotide adverse events included headache and nausea. Common adverse effects include back pain, upper respiratory tract infections, decreased appetite, migraine, and dizziness.
ADX-N05, originally discovered by SK Holdings, is a selective dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (DNRI). ADX-N05 (Solriamfetol, sold under the brand name Sunosi) is approved in the US and is under regulatory review in the EU to improve wakefulness in adult patients with hypersomnia associated with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnoea.The US FDA has approved solriamfetol (Sunosi, Jazz Pharmaceuticals) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea.The dual-acting dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor is approved for narcolepsy in once-daily 75 mg and 150 mg doses, and in obstructive sleep apnea in once-daily 37.5 mg, 75 mg, and 150 mg doses.
Upadacitinib (ABT-494) is a Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) inhibitor currently being developed by AbbVie for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriatic arthritis. It is also being investigated as a potential treatment for people with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Currently, upadacitinib is being evaluatedin six global phase III studies in RA and twophase III studies in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), inaddition to phase II studies in Crohn’s disease and atopicdermatitis and a combined phase II/III study inulcerative colitis. Upadacitinib is a potent and selective Janus kinase (JAK) 1 inhibitor with an IC50 of 43 nM.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Pretomanid (PA-824) is an experimental anti-tuberculosis drug. Pretomanid is a bicyclic nitroimidazole-like molecule with a very complex mechanism of action. It is active against both replicating and hypoxic, non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a potential TB therapy, it has many attractive characteristics - most notably its novel mechanism of action, its activity in vitro against all tested drug-resistant clinical isolates, and its activity as both a potent bactericidal and a sterilizing agent in mice. In addition, the compound shows no evidence of mutagenicity in a standard battery of genotoxicity studies, no significant cytochrome P450 interactions, and no significant activity against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This compound has been developed by TB Alliance and is a potential cornerstone of future TB and drug-resistant TB treatment regimens. It is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials.
Triclabendazole, (brand name Avomec, Egaten, etc) is a member of the benzimidazole family of anthelmintics used to treat liver flukes, specifically fascioliasis and paragonimiasis. Triclabendazole used routinely since 1983 in veterinary practice for the treatment of fascioliasis. It was not used in humans until the 1989 epidemic of fascioliasis near the Caspian Sea when Iranian authorities approved the use of the veterinary formulation to treat the infection. Fasciolicidal not only against the adult worms present in the biliary ducts, but also against the immature larval stages of Fasciola migrating through the hepatic parenchyma. Triclabendazole is shown to penetrate into liver flukes by transtegumentary absorption followed by inhibition of the parasite's motility, probably related to the destruction of the microtubular structure, resulting in the death of the parasite; the immobilizing effect is paralleled by changes in the parasite's resting tegumental membrane potential, strongly inhibiting the release of proteolytic enzymes, a process that appears critical to the survival of the parasite. Side effects are generally few, but can include abdominal pain and headaches. Biliary colic may occur due to dying worms. While no harms have been found with use during pregnancy, triclabendazole has not been well studied in this population. Triclabendazole is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system. It is not commercially available in the United States.