U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

Showing 11 - 20 of 1890 results


Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)


Conditions:

Migalastat (Galafold)-a small molecule drug developed by Amicus Therapeutics that restores the activity of specific mutant forms of α-galactosidase-has been approved for the treatment of Fabry disease in the EU in patients with amenable mutations. Migalastat attaches to certain unstable forms of alpha-galactosidase A, stabilising the enzyme. This allows the enzyme to be transported into areas of the cell where it can break down GL-3. Under the trade name Galafold (formerly known as Amigal), Migalastat is used to treat patients aged 16 years or over with Fabry disease. Because the number of patients with Fabry disease is low, the disease is considered ‘rare’, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) assigned Galafold orphan drug status in 2004, and the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) followed in 2006.
Status:
First approved in 2018

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)



Lofexidine is newly FDA approved in the United States under the brand name LUCEMYRA for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms in adults. Lofexidine acts as an agonist to α2 adrenergic receptors. These receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity, leading to the inhibition of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The inhibition of cAMP leads to potassium efflux through calcium-activated channels, blocking calcium ions from entering the nerve terminal, resulting in suppression of neural firing, inhibition of norepinephrine release. Lofexidine replaces the opioid-driven inhibition of cAMP production and moderating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal.
Tafenoquine is anti-malaria drug originated in Walter reed army institute of research and developed by GSK and 60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals. In 2018 United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved single dose tafenoquine for the radical cure (prevention of relapse) of Plasmodium vivax malaria. Tafenoquine, an 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial, is active against all the stages of Plasmodium species that include the hypnozoite (dormant stage) in the liver. Studies in vitro with the erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium falciparum suggest that tafenoquine may exert its effect by inhibiting hematin polymerization and inducing apoptotic like death of the parasite. In addition to its effect on the parasite, tafenoquine causes red blood cell shrinkage in vitro. Tafenoquine is active against pre-erythrocytic (liver) and erythrocytic (asexual) forms as well as gametocytes of Plasmodium species that include P. falciparum and P. vivax. The activity of tafenoquine against the pre-erythrocytic liver stages of the parasite, prevents the development of the erythrocytic forms of the parasite.
Elagolix (ABT-620) is an oral gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist being studied for the treatment of endometriosis and uterine fibroids. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved AbbVie's elagolix under the brand name Orilissa as the first and only oral gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist specifically developed for women with moderate to severe endometriosis pain.
Fostamatinib is a pro-drug of a Syk inhibitor R406 initially developed by Rigel Pharmaceuticals, but then in-licensed by AstraZeneca. It reached phase III of clinical trials for such diseases as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura, however, AstraZeneca decided not to proceed with regulatory filings and return the rights to the compound to Rigel Pharmaceuticals. In 2018 the drug was approved by the FDA for treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenia. Fostamatinib is being developed for Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (phase II), graft versus host disease (phase I) and ovarian cancer (phase I).
Avatrombopag is an orally bioavailable, small molecule thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist that stimulates proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes from bone marrow progenitor cells resulting in increased production of platelets. Avatrombopag does not compete with TPO for binding to the TPO receptor and has an additive effect with TPO on platelet production. Avatrombopag was discovered by Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical, developed by AkaRx which late became acquired by Dova Pharmaceuticals. In 2018 avatrombopag was approved by the FDA for thrombocytopenia in adults with chronic liver disease scheduled to undergo a procedure.
Encorafenib, also known as BRAFTOVI or LGX818, is an orally available mutated BRaf V600E inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity, which was developed by Novartis. LGX818 possesses selective anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity in cells expressing BRAFV600E. In the A375 (BRAFV600E) human melanoma cell line LGX818 suppresses phospho-ERK (EC50 = 3 nM) leading to potent inhibition of proliferation (EC50 = 4 nM). No significant activity was observed against a panel of 100 kinases (IC50 > 900 nM) and LGX818 did not inhibit proliferation of > 400 cell lines expressing wild-type BRAF. On June 27, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration approved encorafenib and Binimetinib (BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI, Array BioPharma Inc.) in combination for patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600E or V600K mutation, as detected by an FDA-approved test. Encorafenib and binimetinib target two different kinases in the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway. Compared with either drug alone, co-administration of encorafenib and binimetinib result in greater anti-proliferative activity in vitro in BRAF mutation-positive cell lines and greater anti-tumor activity with respect to tumor growth inhibition in BRAF V600E mutant human melanoma xenograft studies in mice. In addition to the above, the combination of encorafenib and binimetinib acted to delay the emergence of resistance in BRAF V600E mutant human melanoma xenografts in mice compared with the administration of either drug alone. Encorafenib is in phase III for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and in phase II for Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)


Conditions:

Sarecycline (SC1401, WC3035) is a novel, once-daily, tetracycline-derived compound being developed by Paratek Pharmaceuticals and Allergan (previously Actavis) for use in the treatment of acne and rosacea. In preclinical studies, Sarecycline possesses favorable anti-inflammatory activity, plus narrow-spectrum antibacterial activity relative to other tetracycline-derived molecules. Sarecycline has been used in Phase III clinical trials studying the treatment of Acne Vulgaris. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral Sarecycline 1.5 mg/kg per day compared to placebo in treating inflammatory acne lesions in subjects with moderate to severe acne. Sarecycline was statistically significantly superior to placebo with respect to primary efficacy endpoints. The most common adverse events (>2%) reported in the sarecycline group were nausea (3.2%), nasopharyngitis (2.8%), and headache (2.8%). The rate of discontinuation due to adverse events among sarecycline-treated patients in the two studies combined was 1.4%.
Binimetinib (MEK162) is an oral small-molecule with potential antineoplastic activity. It is a selective mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor, a key protein kinase in the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, which regulates several key cellular activities including proliferation, differentiation, migration, survival and angiogenesis. Inappropriate activation of this pathway has been shown to occur in many cancers, in particular through mutations in BRAF, KRAS and NRAS. MEK162 at 6 mg/kg, BID combined with BEZ235 (dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth in immunodeficient mice injected with MCF7 cells. There are three ongoing Phase 3 trials with binimetinib in advanced cancer patients: NEMO (NRAS-mutant melanoma), COLUMBUS (encorafenib in combination with binimetinib in BRAF-mutant melanoma) and BEACON CRC (encorafenib, binimetinib and cetuximab in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer).

Showing 11 - 20 of 1890 results