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Details

Stereochemistry ABSOLUTE
Molecular Formula 2C21H39N7O12.3H2O4S
Molecular Weight 1457.3886
Optical Activity UNSPECIFIED
Defined Stereocenters 30 / 30
E/Z Centers 0
Charge 0

SHOW SMILES / InChI
Structure of STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE

SMILES

C[C@@]1([H])[C@](C=O)([C@]([H])([C@@]([H])(O1)O[C@]2([H])[C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@@]2([H])O)O)NC(=N)N)O)NC(=N)N)O[C@@]3([H])[C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@]([H])([C@]([H])(CO)O3)O)O)NC)O.C[C@@]1([H])[C@](C=O)([C@]([H])([C@@]([H])(O1)O[C@]2([H])[C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@@]2([H])O)O)NC(=N)N)O)NC(=N)N)O[C@@]3([H])[C@]([H])([C@@]([H])([C@]([H])([C@]([H])(CO)O3)O)O)NC)O.OS(=O)(=O)O.OS(=O)(=O)O.OS(=O)(=O)O

InChI

InChIKey=QTENRWWVYAAPBI-YCRXJPFRSA-N
InChI=1S/2C21H39N7O12.3H2O4S/c2*1-5-21(36,4-30)16(40-17-9(26-2)13(34)10(31)6(3-29)38-17)18(37-5)39-15-8(28-20(24)25)11(32)7(27-19(22)23)12(33)14(15)35;3*1-5(2,3)4/h2*4-18,26,29,31-36H,3H2,1-2H3,(H4,22,23,27)(H4,24,25,28);3*(H2,1,2,3,4)/t2*5-,6-,7+,8-,9-,10-,11+,12-,13-,14+,15+,16-,17-,18-,21+;;;/m00.../s1

HIDE SMILES / InChI

Molecular Formula C21H39N7O12
Molecular Weight 581.5749
Charge 0
Count
Stereochemistry ABSOLUTE
Additional Stereochemistry No
Defined Stereocenters 15 / 15
E/Z Centers 0
Optical Activity UNSPECIFIED

Molecular Formula H2O4S
Molecular Weight 98.0796
Charge 0
Count
Stereochemistry ACHIRAL
Additional Stereochemistry No
Defined Stereocenters 0 / 0
E/Z Centers 0
Optical Activity NONE

Description
Curator's Comment:: Description was created based on several sources, including http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2012/064210s009lbl.pdf

Streptomycin is a water-soluble aminoglycoside derived from Streptomyces griseus. Aminoglycosides work by binding to the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit, causing misreading of t-RNA, leaving the bacterium unable to synthesize proteins vital to its growth. Aminoglycosides are useful primarily in infections involving aerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Enterobacter. In addition, some mycobacteria, including the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, are susceptible to aminoglycosides. Infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria can also be treated with aminoglycosides, but other types of antibiotics are more potent and less damaging to the host. In the past the aminoglycosides have been used in conjunction with penicillin-related antibiotics in streptococcal infections for their synergistic effects, particularly in endocarditis. Aminoglycosides are mostly ineffective against anaerobic bacteria, fungi and viruses. Aminoglycosides like Streptomycin "irreversibly" bind to specific 30S-subunit proteins and 16S rRNA. Specifically Streptomycin binds to four nucleotides of 16S rRNA and a single amino acid of protein S12. This interferes with decoding site in the vicinity of nucleotide 1400 in 16S rRNA of 30S subunit. This region interacts with the wobble base in the anticodon of tRNA. This leads to interference with the initiation complex, misreading of mRNA so incorrect amino acids are inserted into the polypeptide leading to nonfunctional or toxic peptides and the breakup of polysomes into nonfunctional monosomes. Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of tuberculosis. May also be used in combination with other drugs to treat tularemia (Francisella tularensis), plague (Yersia pestis), severe M. avium complex, brucellosis, and enterococcal endocarditis (e.g. E. faecalis, E. faecium).

Originator

Curator's Comment:: Selman Waksman, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery, has since generally been credited as streptomycin's sole discoverer. However, one of Waksman's graduate students, Albert Schatz, was legally recognized as streptomycin's co-discoverer.

Approval Year

TargetsConditions

Conditions

ConditionModalityTargetsHighest PhaseProduct
Curative
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE

Approved Use

Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe infections caused by susceptibile strains of microorganisms in the specific conditions listed below: Mycobacterium tuberculosis: The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the American Thoracic Society, and the Center for Disease Control recommend that either streptomycin or ethambutol be added as a fourth drug in a regimen containing isoniazid (INH), rifampin and pyrazinamide for initial treatment of tuberculosis unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is very low. The need for a fourth drug should be reassessed when the results of susceptibility testing are known. In the past when the national rate of primary drug resistance to isoniazid was known to be less than 4% and was either stable or declining, therapy with two and three drug regimens was considered adequate. If community rates of INH resistance are currently less than 4%, an initial treatment regimen with less than four drugs may be considered. Streptomycin is also indicated for therapy of tuberculosis when one or more of the above drugs is contraindicated because of toxicity or intolerance. The management of tuberculosis has become more complex as a consequence of increasing rates of drug resistance and concomitant HIV infection. Additional consultation from experts in the treatment of tuberculosis may be desirable in those settings. Non-tuberculosis infections: The use of streptomycin should be limited to the treatment of infections caused by bacteria which have been shown to be susceptible to the antibacterial effects of streptomycin and which are not amenable to therapy with less potentially toxic agents. Pasteurella pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis (donovanosis, granuloma inguinale), H. ducreyi (chancroid), H. influenzae (in respiratory, endocardial, and meningeal infections-concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), K. pneumoniae pneumonia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), E.coli, Proteus, A. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infections, Streptococcus viridans, Enterococcus faecalis (in endocardial infections -concomitantly with penicillin), Gram-negative bacillary bacteremia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of streptomycin and other antibacterial drugs, streptomycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

-7.532352E11
Curative
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE

Approved Use

Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe infections caused by susceptibile strains of microorganisms in the specific conditions listed below: Mycobacterium tuberculosis: The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the American Thoracic Society, and the Center for Disease Control recommend that either streptomycin or ethambutol be added as a fourth drug in a regimen containing isoniazid (INH), rifampin and pyrazinamide for initial treatment of tuberculosis unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is very low. The need for a fourth drug should be reassessed when the results of susceptibility testing are known. In the past when the national rate of primary drug resistance to isoniazid was known to be less than 4% and was either stable or declining, therapy with two and three drug regimens was considered adequate. If community rates of INH resistance are currently less than 4%, an initial treatment regimen with less than four drugs may be considered. Streptomycin is also indicated for therapy of tuberculosis when one or more of the above drugs is contraindicated because of toxicity or intolerance. The management of tuberculosis has become more complex as a consequence of increasing rates of drug resistance and concomitant HIV infection. Additional consultation from experts in the treatment of tuberculosis may be desirable in those settings. Non-tuberculosis infections: The use of streptomycin should be limited to the treatment of infections caused by bacteria which have been shown to be susceptible to the antibacterial effects of streptomycin and which are not amenable to therapy with less potentially toxic agents. Pasteurella pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis (donovanosis, granuloma inguinale), H. ducreyi (chancroid), H. influenzae (in respiratory, endocardial, and meningeal infections-concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), K. pneumoniae pneumonia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), E.coli, Proteus, A. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infections, Streptococcus viridans, Enterococcus faecalis (in endocardial infections -concomitantly with penicillin), Gram-negative bacillary bacteremia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of streptomycin and other antibacterial drugs, streptomycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

-7.532352E11
Curative
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE

Approved Use

Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe infections caused by susceptibile strains of microorganisms in the specific conditions listed below: Mycobacterium tuberculosis: The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the American Thoracic Society, and the Center for Disease Control recommend that either streptomycin or ethambutol be added as a fourth drug in a regimen containing isoniazid (INH), rifampin and pyrazinamide for initial treatment of tuberculosis unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is very low. The need for a fourth drug should be reassessed when the results of susceptibility testing are known. In the past when the national rate of primary drug resistance to isoniazid was known to be less than 4% and was either stable or declining, therapy with two and three drug regimens was considered adequate. If community rates of INH resistance are currently less than 4%, an initial treatment regimen with less than four drugs may be considered. Streptomycin is also indicated for therapy of tuberculosis when one or more of the above drugs is contraindicated because of toxicity or intolerance. The management of tuberculosis has become more complex as a consequence of increasing rates of drug resistance and concomitant HIV infection. Additional consultation from experts in the treatment of tuberculosis may be desirable in those settings. Non-tuberculosis infections: The use of streptomycin should be limited to the treatment of infections caused by bacteria which have been shown to be susceptible to the antibacterial effects of streptomycin and which are not amenable to therapy with less potentially toxic agents. Pasteurella pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis (donovanosis, granuloma inguinale), H. ducreyi (chancroid), H. influenzae (in respiratory, endocardial, and meningeal infections-concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), K. pneumoniae pneumonia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), E.coli, Proteus, A. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infections, Streptococcus viridans, Enterococcus faecalis (in endocardial infections -concomitantly with penicillin), Gram-negative bacillary bacteremia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of streptomycin and other antibacterial drugs, streptomycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

-7.532352E11
Curative
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE

Approved Use

Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe infections caused by susceptibile strains of microorganisms in the specific conditions listed below: Mycobacterium tuberculosis: The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the American Thoracic Society, and the Center for Disease Control recommend that either streptomycin or ethambutol be added as a fourth drug in a regimen containing isoniazid (INH), rifampin and pyrazinamide for initial treatment of tuberculosis unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is very low. The need for a fourth drug should be reassessed when the results of susceptibility testing are known. In the past when the national rate of primary drug resistance to isoniazid was known to be less than 4% and was either stable or declining, therapy with two and three drug regimens was considered adequate. If community rates of INH resistance are currently less than 4%, an initial treatment regimen with less than four drugs may be considered. Streptomycin is also indicated for therapy of tuberculosis when one or more of the above drugs is contraindicated because of toxicity or intolerance. The management of tuberculosis has become more complex as a consequence of increasing rates of drug resistance and concomitant HIV infection. Additional consultation from experts in the treatment of tuberculosis may be desirable in those settings. Non-tuberculosis infections: The use of streptomycin should be limited to the treatment of infections caused by bacteria which have been shown to be susceptible to the antibacterial effects of streptomycin and which are not amenable to therapy with less potentially toxic agents. Pasteurella pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis (donovanosis, granuloma inguinale), H. ducreyi (chancroid), H. influenzae (in respiratory, endocardial, and meningeal infections-concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), K. pneumoniae pneumonia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent), E.coli, Proteus, A. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infections, Streptococcus viridans, Enterococcus faecalis (in endocardial infections -concomitantly with penicillin), Gram-negative bacillary bacteremia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of streptomycin and other antibacterial drugs, streptomycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

-7.532352E11
Cmax

Cmax

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
42.6 μg/mL
18 mg/kg single, intramuscular
dose: 18 mg/kg
route of administration: Intramuscular
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
STREPTOMYCIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: UNHEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: FEMALE / MALE
food status: UNKNOWN
AUC

AUC

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
264 μg × h/mL
18 mg/kg single, intramuscular
dose: 18 mg/kg
route of administration: Intramuscular
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
STREPTOMYCIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: UNHEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: FEMALE / MALE
food status: UNKNOWN
T1/2

T1/2

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
2.67 h
18 mg/kg single, intramuscular
dose: 18 mg/kg
route of administration: Intramuscular
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
STREPTOMYCIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: UNHEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: FEMALE / MALE
food status: UNKNOWN
Doses

Doses

DosePopulationAdverse events​
1 g 1 times / day multiple, intramuscular
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intramuscular
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
Doxycycline(100 mg oral; 2/day)
Sources: Page: p.2066
unhealthy, 12–70
n = 94
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Brucellosis
Age Group: 12–70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 94
Sources: Page: p.2066
Disc. AE: Heartburn, Fatigue...
AEs leading to
discontinuation/dose reduction:
Heartburn (1.06%)
Fatigue (1.06%)
Sources: Page: p.2066
1 g 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
lsoniazid(300 mg iv; 1/day)
rifampicin(600 mg iv; 1/day)
pyrazinamide(2 g iv; 1/day)
Sources: Page: p.47
unhealthy, 15-70
n = 119
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Pulmonary tuberculosis
Age Group: 15-70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 119
Sources: Page: p.47
Disc. AE: Hypersensitivity, Disorder vestibular...
AEs leading to
discontinuation/dose reduction:
Hypersensitivity (1.7%)
Disorder vestibular (0.84%)
Sources: Page: p.47
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 13
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 13
Sources: Page: p.1539
Other AEs: Ototoxicity, Nephrotoxicity...
Other AEs:
Ototoxicity
Nephrotoxicity
Vestibular toxicity
Sources: Page: p.1539
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 3
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 3
Sources: Page: p.1539
Other AEs: Ototoxicity, Nephrotoxicity...
Other AEs:
Ototoxicity
Nephrotoxicity
Vestibular toxicity
Sources: Page: p.1539
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 10
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 10
Sources: Page: p.1539
Other AEs: Ototoxicity, Nephrotoxicity...
Other AEs:
Ototoxicity
Nephrotoxicity
Sources: Page: p.1539
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 6
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 6
Sources: Page: p.1539
Other AEs: Ototoxicity, Nephrotoxicity...
Other AEs:
Ototoxicity
Nephrotoxicity
Sources: Page: p.1539
AEs

AEs

AESignificanceDosePopulation
Fatigue 1.06%
Disc. AE
1 g 1 times / day multiple, intramuscular
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intramuscular
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
Doxycycline(100 mg oral; 2/day)
Sources: Page: p.2066
unhealthy, 12–70
n = 94
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Brucellosis
Age Group: 12–70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 94
Sources: Page: p.2066
Heartburn 1.06%
Disc. AE
1 g 1 times / day multiple, intramuscular
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intramuscular
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
Doxycycline(100 mg oral; 2/day)
Sources: Page: p.2066
unhealthy, 12–70
n = 94
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Brucellosis
Age Group: 12–70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 94
Sources: Page: p.2066
Disorder vestibular 0.84%
Disc. AE
1 g 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
lsoniazid(300 mg iv; 1/day)
rifampicin(600 mg iv; 1/day)
pyrazinamide(2 g iv; 1/day)
Sources: Page: p.47
unhealthy, 15-70
n = 119
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Pulmonary tuberculosis
Age Group: 15-70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 119
Sources: Page: p.47
Hypersensitivity 1.7%
Disc. AE
1 g 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1 g, 1 times / day
Co-administed with::
lsoniazid(300 mg iv; 1/day)
rifampicin(600 mg iv; 1/day)
pyrazinamide(2 g iv; 1/day)
Sources: Page: p.47
unhealthy, 15-70
n = 119
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Pulmonary tuberculosis
Age Group: 15-70
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 119
Sources: Page: p.47
Nephrotoxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 13
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 13
Sources: Page: p.1539
Ototoxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 13
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 13
Sources: Page: p.1539
Vestibular toxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 13
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 13
Sources: Page: p.1539
Nephrotoxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 3
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 3
Sources: Page: p.1539
Ototoxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 3
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 3
Sources: Page: p.1539
Vestibular toxicity
1225 mg 3 times / week steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 1225 mg, 3 times / week
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 25–76
n = 3
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 25–76
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 3
Sources: Page: p.1539
Nephrotoxicity
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 10
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 10
Sources: Page: p.1539
Ototoxicity
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 10
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium avium complex
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 10
Sources: Page: p.1539
Nephrotoxicity
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 6
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 6
Sources: Page: p.1539
Ototoxicity
800 mg 1 times / day steady, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: steady
Dose: 800 mg, 1 times / day
Sources: Page: p.1539
unhealthy, 26–73
n = 6
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Age Group: 26–73
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 6
Sources: Page: p.1539
Overview

Overview

CYP3A4CYP2C9CYP2D6hERG

OverviewOther

Other InhibitorOther SubstrateOther Inducer



Drug as perpetrator​

Drug as perpetrator​

TargetModalityActivityMetaboliteClinical evidence
not determined
not determined
yes [IC50 33.2 uM]
PubMed

PubMed

TitleDatePubMed
A method for evaluating antitubercular activity in mice.
1949 Dec 14
The evaluation of neomycin and other antimicrobial agents of bacterial and fungal origin, and substances from higher plants.
1949 Dec 14
Antituberculosis agents. VI. Streptidine-oxyethyl beta-D-glucopyranoside.
1960 Apr
Oxazolidinones, a new class of synthetic antituberculosis agent. In vitro and in vivo activities of DuP-721 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
1991 Nov-Dec
The Garrod Lecture. Understanding the chemotherapy of tuberculosis--current problems.
1992 May
[A case of pulmonary tuberculosis associated with severe skin eruption, prominent eosinophilia, and liver dysfunction induced by streptomycin].
1992 May
A novel mitochondrial mutation, 1556C --> T, in a Japanese patient with streptomycin-induced tinnitus.
2004 Apr
Pancytopenia due to extensive hemophagocytosis following anti-tubercular treatment.
2004 Feb
Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular modeling studies of halogenated 4-[1H-imidazol-1-yl(phenyl)methyl]-1,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrazoles.
2004 Oct 15
Intracellular localization of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) virus glycoproteins.
2005 Apr 25
Neogenin expression may be inversely correlated to the tumorigenicity of human breast cancer.
2005 Dec 3
Cloning of the koi herpesvirus (KHV) gene encoding thymidine kinase and its use for a highly sensitive PCR based diagnosis.
2005 Mar 17
Differential antibiotic susceptibilities of starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.
2005 Nov
Is liver transplantation advisable for isoniazid fulminant hepatitis in active extrapulmonary tuberculosis?
2005 Nov
Signaling of the Human P2Y(1) Receptor Measured by a Yeast Growth Assay with Comparisons to Assays of Phospholipase C and Calcium Mobilization in 1321N1 Human Astrocytoma Cells.
2005 Sep
Fluoroquinolones: an important class of antibiotics against tuberculosis.
2006
Rapid microbiologic and pharmacologic evaluation of experimental compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
2006 Apr
Enhanced susceptibility of multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to granulysin peptides correlates with a reduced fitness phenotype.
2006 Jul
Endostatin inhibits VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro.
2006 Jul 13
Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) induces the activation/phosphorylation of Akt kinase and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) by activating different signaling pathways in PC12 cells.
2006 Jun 22
[Isoniazid-induced visual hallucinosis].
2006 Mar
Activity of 7-methyljuglone in combination with antituberculous drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
2006 Nov
Dexamethasone stimulates expression of C-type Natriuretic Peptide in chondrocytes.
2006 Nov 20
Time- and concentration-dependent changes in gene expression induced by benzo(a)pyrene in two human cell lines, MCF-7 and HepG2.
2006 Oct 16
Antituberculous therapy-induced fulminant hepatic failure: successful treatment with liver transplantation and nonstandard antituberculous therapy.
2006 Sep
Full-exon resequencing reveals toll-like receptor variants contribute to human susceptibility to tuberculosis disease.
2007 Dec 19
Receptor-induced thiolate couples Env activation to retrovirus fusion and infection.
2007 Dec 21
Resistance of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis to nitric oxide correlates with disease severity in Tegumentary Leishmaniasis.
2007 Feb 22
ArhGAP9, a novel MAP kinase docking protein, inhibits Erk and p38 activation through WW domain binding.
2007 Feb 6
Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation in vivo impairs establishment of gammaherpesvirus latency.
2007 Jan
Interaction between Bluetongue virus outer capsid protein VP2 and vimentin is necessary for virus egress.
2007 Jan 15
Identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Cryptosporidium parvum by de novo pattern finding.
2007 Jan 9
Selective damage of the vestibular apparatus following toxic effects of streptomycin.
2007 Jul
Streptomycin action to the mammalian inner ear vestibular organs: comparison between pigmented guinea pigs and rats.
2007 Jul-Aug
Effect and mechanism of lipopolysaccharide on allergen-induced interleukin-5 and eotaxins production by whole blood cultures of atopic asthmatics.
2007 Mar
Gentamicin suppresses endotoxin-driven TNF-alpha production in human and mouse proximal tubule cells.
2007 Oct
Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins.
2007 Oct 19
Regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta functions by modification of the small ubiquitin-like modifier.
2008
Curcumin inhibits glyoxalase 1: a possible link to its anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activity.
2008
The effect of radio-adaptive doses on HT29 and GM637 cells.
2008 Apr 23
Prevention of SIV rectal transmission and priming of T cell responses in macaques after local pre-exposure application of tenofovir gel.
2008 Aug 5
Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild.
2008 Feb 5
Mucosal damage and neutropenia are required for Candida albicans dissemination.
2008 Feb 8
(R)-albuterol decreases immune responses: role of activated T cells.
2008 Jan 14
Effect of attenuation of Treg during BCG immunization on anti-mycobacterial Th1 responses and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
2008 Jul 30
Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways.
2008 Jun 10
Mouse hepatitis coronavirus RNA replication depends on GBF1-mediated ARF1 activation.
2008 Jun 13
Human IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells.
2008 Jun 3
Effect of Ras inhibition in hematopoiesis and BCR/ABL leukemogenesis.
2008 Jun 5
In infertile women, cells from Chlamydia trachomatis infected sites release higher levels of interferon-gamma, interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha upon heat-shock-protein stimulation than fertile women.
2008 May 20
Patents

Sample Use Guides

Intramuscular Route Only Adults: The preferred site is the upper outer quadrant of the buttock, (i.e., gluteus maximus), or themid-lateral thigh. Children: It is recommended that intramuscular injections be given preferably in the mid-lateral muscles of the thigh. In infants and small children the periphery of the upper outer quadrant of the gluteal region should be used only when necessary, such as in burn patients, in order to minimize the possibility of damage to the sciatic nerve. 1. TUBERCULOSIS: Children daily - 20-40 mg/kg Adults daily - 15 mg/kg Streptomycin is usually administered daily as a single intramuscular injection. A total dose of not more than 120 g over the course of therapy should be given unless there are no other therapeutic options. 2. TULAREMIA: One to 2 g daily in divided doses for 7 to 14 days until the patient is afebrile for 5 to 7 days. 3. PLAGUE: Two grams of Streptomycin daily in two divided doses should be administered intramuscularly. A minimum of 10 days of therapy is recommended. 4. BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS: a. Streptococcal endocarditis; in penicillin-sensitive alpha and non-hemolytic streptococcal endocarditis (penicillin MIC<0.1 mcg/mL), Streptomycin may be used for 2-week treatment concomitantly with penicillin. The Streptomycin regimen is 1 g b.i.d. for the first week, and 500 mg b.i.d. for the second week. If the patient is over 60 years of age, the dosage should be 500 mg b.i.d. for the entire 2- week period. b. Enterococcal endocarditis: Streptomycin in doses of 1 g b.i.d. for 2 weeks and 500 mg b.i.d. for an additional 4 weeks is given in combination with penicillin. Ototoxicity may require termination of the Streptomycin prior to completion of the 6-week course of treatment. 5. CONCOMITANT USE WITH OTHER AGENTS: For concomitant use with other agents to which the infecting organism is also sensitive: Streptomycin is considered a secondline agent for the treatment of gram-negative bacillary bactermia, meningitis, and pneumonia; brucellosis; granuloma inguinale; chancroid, and urinary tract infection. For adults: 1 to 2 grams in divided doses every six to twelve hours for moderate to severe infections. Doses should generally not exceed 2 grams per day. For children: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day (8 to 20 mg/lb/day) in divided doses every 6 to 12 hours. (Particular care should be taken to avoid excessive dosage in children).
Route of Administration: Intramuscular
In Vitro Use Guide
At 5 and 50 ug/ml, streptomycin inhibited the tubercle bacilli strongly and killed some; at the lowest tested concentration of 0.5 ug/ml, it inhibited them weakly.
Substance Class Chemical
Created
by admin
on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
Edited
by admin
on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
Record UNII
CW25IKJ202
Record Status Validated (UNII)
Record Version
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Name Type Language
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE
EP   GREEN BOOK   MART.   ORANGE BOOK   USP   USP-RS   VANDF   WHO-DD   WHO-IP  
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [ORANGE BOOK]
Common Name English
STRYCIN
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [VANDF]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE (NON-INJECTABLE) [WHO-IP]
Common Name English
D-STREPTAMINE, O-2-DEOXY-2-(METHYLAMINO)-.ALPHA.-L-GLUCOPYRANOSYL-(1->2)-O-5-DEOXY-3-C-FORMYL-.ALPHA.-L-LYXOFURANOSYL-(1->4)-N,N'-BIS(AMINOIMINOMETHYL)-, SULFATE (2:3) (SALT)
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [WHO-DD]
Common Name English
AGRIMYCIN SULFATE
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [MART.]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [USP MONOGRAPH]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [JAN]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN (AS SULFATE)
Common Name English
VETSTREP
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [EP MONOGRAPH]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULPHATE
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [USP-RS]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULPHATE (2:3) (SALT)
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCINI SULFAS [WHO-IP LATIN]
Common Name English
NSC-757316
Code English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [WHO-IP]
Common Name English
D-STREPTAMINE, O-2-DEOXY-2-(METHYLAMINO)-.ALPHA.-L-GLUCOPYRANOSYL-(1->2)-O-5-DEOXY-3-C-FORMYL-.ALPHA.-L-LYXOFURANOSYL-(1->4)-N,N'-BIS(AMINOIMINOMETHYL)-, SULPHATE (2:3) (SALT)
Common Name English
AGRIMYCIN 17
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE [GREEN BOOK]
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SESQUISULFATE [MI]
Common Name English
AMBISTRYN S
Common Name English
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE (2:3) (SALT)
Common Name English
Classification Tree Code System Code
NCI_THESAURUS C2363
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
EPA PESTICIDE CODE 6310
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
CFR 21 CFR 520.154B
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
Code System Code Type Description
ChEMBL
CHEMBL372795
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
EPA CompTox
3810-74-0
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
CAS
3810-74-0
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
NCI_THESAURUS
C47729
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
ECHA (EC/EINECS)
223-286-0
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
USP_CATALOG
1623003
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY USP-RS
FDA UNII
CW25IKJ202
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
RXCUI
10110
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY RxNorm
DRUG BANK
DBSALT000422
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
PUBCHEM
19648
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
WHO INTERNATIONAL PHARMACOPEIA
STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY Description: A white or almost white powder; odourless or with a slight odour. Solubility: Very soluble in water; practically insoluble in ethanol (~750 g/l) TS and ether R. Category: Antibiotic. Storage: Streptomycin sulfate should be kept in a well-closed container and protected from moisture. Labelling: The designation sterile Streptomycin sulfate indicates that the substance complies with the additional requirements for sterile Streptomycin sulfate and may be used for parenteral administration or for other sterile applications. Additional information: Streptomycin sulfate is hygroscopic, but it is stable in air and on exposure to light. Definition: Streptomycin sulfate contains not less than 90.0% of (C21H39N7O12)2,3H2SO4 and not less than 720 International Units per mg, both calculated with reference to the dried substance. Manufacture: The method of manufacture is validated to demonstrate that the product, if tested, would comply with the following test.
MERCK INDEX
M10226
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY Merck Index
EVMPD
SUB04593MIG
Created by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Fri Jun 25 21:03:52 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
Related Record Type Details
PARENT -> SALT/SOLVATE
Related Record Type Details
ACTIVE MOIETY