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Details

Stereochemistry ABSOLUTE
Molecular Formula C14H13N8O4S3.Na.5H2O
Molecular Weight 566.5692
Optical Activity UNSPECIFIED
Defined Stereocenters 2 / 2
E/Z Centers 0
Charge 0

SHOW SMILES / InChI
Structure of CEFAZOLIN SODIUM PENTAHYDRATE

SMILES

Cc1nnc(SCC2=C(C(=O)O)N3C(=O)[C@]([H])([C@@]3([H])SC2)N=C(Cn4cnnn4)[O-])s1.[Na+].O.O.O.O.O

InChI

InChIKey=KHQJKXHCWOHDQD-HGUWTHONSA-M
InChI=1S/C14H14N8O4S3.Na.5H2O/c1-6-17-18-14(29-6)28-4-7-3-27-12-9(11(24)22(12)10(7)13(25)26)16-8(23)2-21-5-15-19-20-21;;;;;;/h5,9,12H,2-4H2,1H3,(H,16,23)(H,25,26);;5*1H2/q;+1;;;;;/p-1/t9-,12-;;;;;;/m1....../s1

HIDE SMILES / InChI

Molecular Formula Na
Molecular Weight 22.9898
Charge 1
Count
Stereochemistry ACHIRAL
Additional Stereochemistry No
Defined Stereocenters 0 / 0
E/Z Centers 0
Optical Activity NONE

Molecular Formula H2O
Molecular Weight 18.0153
Charge 0
Count
Stereochemistry ACHIRAL
Additional Stereochemistry No
Defined Stereocenters 0 / 0
E/Z Centers 0
Optical Activity NONE

Molecular Formula C14H14N8O4S3
Molecular Weight 454.511
Charge 0
Count
Stereochemistry ABSOLUTE
Additional Stereochemistry No
Defined Stereocenters 2 / 2
E/Z Centers 0
Optical Activity UNSPECIFIED

Cefazolin is a semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. By binding to specific penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) located inside the bacterial cell wall, cefazolin inhibits the third and last stage of bacterial cell wall synthesis. Cell lysis is then mediated by bacterial cell wall autolytic enzymes such as autolysins. Cefazolin is used to treat bacterial infections of the skin, moderately severe bacterial infections involving the lung, bone, joint, stomach, blood, and urinary tract. It is clinically effective against infections caused by staphylococci and streptococci species of Gram positive bacteria. This drug also can be used for perioperative prophylaxis.

Approval Year

Targets

Targets

Primary TargetPharmacologyConditionPotency
Conditions

Conditions

ConditionModalityTargetsHighest PhaseProduct
Curative
ANCEF

Approved Use

Cefazolin for Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of the following infections due to susceptible organisms: Respiratory Tract Infections: due to S. penumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Injectable benzathine penicillin is considered to be the drug of choice in treatment and prevention of streptococcal infections, including the prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Cefazolin for Injection, USP is effective in the eradication of streptococci from the nasopharynx; however, data establishing the efficacy of cefazolin in the subsequent prevention of rheumatic fever are not available. Urinary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Skin and Skin Structure Infections: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), S. pyogenes, and other strains of streptococci. Biliary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, various strains of streptococci, P. mirabilis and S. aureus. Bone and Joint Infections: due to S. aureus. Genital Infections: (i.e., prostatitis, epididymitis) due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Septicemia: due to S. pneumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), P. mirabilis, E. coli. Endocarditis: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Appropriate culture and susceptibility studies should be performed to determine susceptibility of the causative organism to cefazolin. Perioperative Prophylaxis: The prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively may reduce the incidence of certain postoperative infections in patients undergoing surgical procedures which are classified as contaminated or potentially contaminated (e.g., vaginal hysterectomy, and cholecystectomy in high-risk patients such as those older than 70 years, with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice or common duct bile stones). The perioperative use of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may also be effective in surgical patients in whom infection at the operative site would present a serious risk (e.g., during open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty). The prophylactic administration of cefazolin should usually be discontinued within a 24 hour period after the surgical procedure. In surgery where the occurrence of infection may be particularly devastating (e.g., open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty), the prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may be continued for 3 to 5 days following the completion of surgery. If there are signs of infection, specimens for cultures should be obtained for the identification of the causative organism so that appropriate therapy may be instituted (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Cefazolin for Injection, USP and other antibacterial drugs, Cefazolin for Injection, USP should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

1.18540796E11
Curative
ANCEF

Approved Use

Cefazolin for Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of the following infections due to susceptible organisms: Respiratory Tract Infections: due to S. penumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Injectable benzathine penicillin is considered to be the drug of choice in treatment and prevention of streptococcal infections, including the prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Cefazolin for Injection, USP is effective in the eradication of streptococci from the nasopharynx; however, data establishing the efficacy of cefazolin in the subsequent prevention of rheumatic fever are not available. Urinary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Skin and Skin Structure Infections: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), S. pyogenes, and other strains of streptococci. Biliary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, various strains of streptococci, P. mirabilis and S. aureus. Bone and Joint Infections: due to S. aureus. Genital Infections: (i.e., prostatitis, epididymitis) due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Septicemia: due to S. pneumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), P. mirabilis, E. coli. Endocarditis: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Appropriate culture and susceptibility studies should be performed to determine susceptibility of the causative organism to cefazolin. Perioperative Prophylaxis: The prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively may reduce the incidence of certain postoperative infections in patients undergoing surgical procedures which are classified as contaminated or potentially contaminated (e.g., vaginal hysterectomy, and cholecystectomy in high-risk patients such as those older than 70 years, with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice or common duct bile stones). The perioperative use of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may also be effective in surgical patients in whom infection at the operative site would present a serious risk (e.g., during open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty). The prophylactic administration of cefazolin should usually be discontinued within a 24 hour period after the surgical procedure. In surgery where the occurrence of infection may be particularly devastating (e.g., open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty), the prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may be continued for 3 to 5 days following the completion of surgery. If there are signs of infection, specimens for cultures should be obtained for the identification of the causative organism so that appropriate therapy may be instituted (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Cefazolin for Injection, USP and other antibacterial drugs, Cefazolin for Injection, USP should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

1.18540796E11
Curative
ANCEF

Approved Use

Cefazolin for Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of the following infections due to susceptible organisms: Respiratory Tract Infections: due to S. penumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Injectable benzathine penicillin is considered to be the drug of choice in treatment and prevention of streptococcal infections, including the prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Cefazolin for Injection, USP is effective in the eradication of streptococci from the nasopharynx; however, data establishing the efficacy of cefazolin in the subsequent prevention of rheumatic fever are not available. Urinary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Skin and Skin Structure Infections: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), S. pyogenes, and other strains of streptococci. Biliary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, various strains of streptococci, P. mirabilis and S. aureus. Bone and Joint Infections: due to S. aureus. Genital Infections: (i.e., prostatitis, epididymitis) due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Septicemia: due to S. pneumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), P. mirabilis, E. coli. Endocarditis: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Appropriate culture and susceptibility studies should be performed to determine susceptibility of the causative organism to cefazolin. Perioperative Prophylaxis: The prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively may reduce the incidence of certain postoperative infections in patients undergoing surgical procedures which are classified as contaminated or potentially contaminated (e.g., vaginal hysterectomy, and cholecystectomy in high-risk patients such as those older than 70 years, with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice or common duct bile stones). The perioperative use of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may also be effective in surgical patients in whom infection at the operative site would present a serious risk (e.g., during open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty). The prophylactic administration of cefazolin should usually be discontinued within a 24 hour period after the surgical procedure. In surgery where the occurrence of infection may be particularly devastating (e.g., open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty), the prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may be continued for 3 to 5 days following the completion of surgery. If there are signs of infection, specimens for cultures should be obtained for the identification of the causative organism so that appropriate therapy may be instituted (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Cefazolin for Injection, USP and other antibacterial drugs, Cefazolin for Injection, USP should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

1.18540796E11
Curative
ANCEF

Approved Use

Cefazolin for Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of the following infections due to susceptible organisms: Respiratory Tract Infections: due to S. penumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Injectable benzathine penicillin is considered to be the drug of choice in treatment and prevention of streptococcal infections, including the prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Cefazolin for Injection, USP is effective in the eradication of streptococci from the nasopharynx; however, data establishing the efficacy of cefazolin in the subsequent prevention of rheumatic fever are not available. Urinary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Skin and Skin Structure Infections: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), S. pyogenes, and other strains of streptococci. Biliary Tract Infections: due to E. coli, various strains of streptococci, P. mirabilis and S. aureus. Bone and Joint Infections: due to S. aureus. Genital Infections: (i.e., prostatitis, epididymitis) due to E. coli, P. mirabilis. Septicemia: due to S. pneumoniae, S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), P. mirabilis, E. coli. Endocarditis: due to S. aureus (including beta-lactamase-producing strains) and S. pyogenes. Appropriate culture and susceptibility studies should be performed to determine susceptibility of the causative organism to cefazolin. Perioperative Prophylaxis: The prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively may reduce the incidence of certain postoperative infections in patients undergoing surgical procedures which are classified as contaminated or potentially contaminated (e.g., vaginal hysterectomy, and cholecystectomy in high-risk patients such as those older than 70 years, with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice or common duct bile stones). The perioperative use of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may also be effective in surgical patients in whom infection at the operative site would present a serious risk (e.g., during open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty). The prophylactic administration of cefazolin should usually be discontinued within a 24 hour period after the surgical procedure. In surgery where the occurrence of infection may be particularly devastating (e.g., open-heart surgery and prosthetic arthroplasty), the prophylactic administration of Cefazolin for Injection, USP may be continued for 3 to 5 days following the completion of surgery. If there are signs of infection, specimens for cultures should be obtained for the identification of the causative organism so that appropriate therapy may be instituted (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Cefazolin for Injection, USP and other antibacterial drugs, Cefazolin for Injection, USP should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Launch Date

1.18540796E11
Cmax

Cmax

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
280.9 μg/mL
2 g single, intravenous
dose: 2 g
route of administration: Intravenous
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
CEFAZOLIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: HEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: UNKNOWN
food status: UNKNOWN
AUC

AUC

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
509.9 μg × h/mL
2 g single, intravenous
dose: 2 g
route of administration: Intravenous
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
CEFAZOLIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: HEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: UNKNOWN
food status: UNKNOWN
T1/2

T1/2

ValueDoseCo-administeredAnalytePopulation
2.01 h
2 g single, intravenous
dose: 2 g
route of administration: Intravenous
experiment type: SINGLE
co-administered:
CEFAZOLIN plasma
Homo sapiens
population: HEALTHY
age: ADULT
sex: UNKNOWN
food status: UNKNOWN
Doses

Doses

DosePopulationAdverse events​
4 g 2 times / day multiple, intravenous
Studied dose
Dose: 4 g, 2 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 4 g, 2 times / day
Sources:
healthy, 21 to 35 years
n = 7
Health Status: healthy
Age Group: 21 to 35 years
Sex: M
Population Size: 7
Sources:
Disc. AE: Rash...
AEs leading to
discontinuation/dose reduction:
Rash (14.3%)
Sources:
1.5 g 8 times / day multiple, intravenous
Highest studied dose
Dose: 1.5 g, 8 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 1.5 g, 8 times / day
Sources:
unhealthy, 21-34 years
n = 4
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: endocarditis
Age Group: 21-34 years
Sex: M+F
Population Size: 4
Sources:
1 g 4 times / day multiple, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 4 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 4 times / day
Sources:
healthy, 75 years
n = 1
Health Status: healthy
Age Group: 75 years
Sex: F
Population Size: 1
Sources:
Other AEs: Pseudomembranous colitis...
Other AEs:
Pseudomembranous colitis
Sources:
1 g 3 times / day multiple, intravenous
Dose: 1 g, 3 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 3 times / day
Sources:
unhealthy
n = 75
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: closed fractures
Population Size: 75
Sources:
Other AEs: Infection...
Other AEs:
Infection (serious, 15 patients)
Sources:
AEs

AEs

AESignificanceDosePopulation
Rash 14.3%
Disc. AE
4 g 2 times / day multiple, intravenous
Studied dose
Dose: 4 g, 2 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 4 g, 2 times / day
Sources:
healthy, 21 to 35 years
n = 7
Health Status: healthy
Age Group: 21 to 35 years
Sex: M
Population Size: 7
Sources:
Pseudomembranous colitis
1 g 4 times / day multiple, intravenous
Recommended
Dose: 1 g, 4 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 4 times / day
Sources:
healthy, 75 years
n = 1
Health Status: healthy
Age Group: 75 years
Sex: F
Population Size: 1
Sources:
Infection serious, 15 patients
1 g 3 times / day multiple, intravenous
Dose: 1 g, 3 times / day
Route: intravenous
Route: multiple
Dose: 1 g, 3 times / day
Sources:
unhealthy
n = 75
Health Status: unhealthy
Condition: closed fractures
Population Size: 75
Sources:
Overview

Overview

CYP3A4CYP2C9CYP2D6hERG

OverviewOther

Other InhibitorOther SubstrateOther Inducer



Drug as perpetrator​

Drug as perpetrator​

TargetModalityActivityMetaboliteClinical evidence
yes [Ki 1740 uM]
yes [Ki 180 uM]
yes [Ki 550 uM]
PubMed

PubMed

TitleDatePubMed
Double-blind comparison of phlebitis produced by cefazolin versus cephalothin.
1975 Apr
Relationship between the transport and toxicity of cephalosporins in the kidney.
1975 Aug
Double-blind comparison of phlebitis associated with cefazolin and cephalothin.
1976 Jul
Hemolysis induced by cefazolin and cephalothin in a patient with penicillin sensitivity.
1978 May-Jun
Cephalosporin-induced cholestatic jaundice.
1982 Aug 7
Combination of amikacin and carbenicillin with or without cefazolin as empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic patients. The International Antimicrobial Therapy Project Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.
1983 Oct
Pharmacological profile of the new anticonvulsant etazepine.
1989 Apr
Drugs as allergens: an immunoassay for detecting IgE antibodies to cephalosporins.
1990
Low convulsive activity of a new carbapenem antibiotic, DK-35C, as compared with existing congeners.
1999 Nov 5
Amykacin-related apneic episode in an infant on peritoneal dialysis.
2000 Apr
Antibacterials for the prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial endocarditis in children.
2001
Use of charge-transfer complexation in the spectrophotometric analysis of certain cephalosporins.
2001 Jul 6
Retrospective analysis of drug-induced urticaria and angioedema: a survey of 2287 patients.
2001 Nov
Fine structural recognition specificities of IgE antibodies distinguishing amoxicilloyl and amoxicillanyl determinants in allergic subjects.
2001 Sep-Oct
Stability of cefazolin sodium in icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysis solution.
2002 Dec 1
Differences in neutrophil death among beta-lactam antibiotics after in vitro killing of bacteria.
2002 Jul
Effect of water content on the solid-state stability in two isomorphic clathrates of cephalosporin: cefazolin sodium pentahydrate (alpha form) and FK041 hydrate.
2002 Jun
Stability of three cephalosporin antibiotics in AutoDose Infusion System bags.
2002 May-Jun
beta-Lactam allergenic determinants: fine structural recognition of a cross-reacting determinant on benzylpenicillin and cephalothin.
2002 Nov
The effect of additives on the crystallization of cefazolin sodium during freeze-drying.
2003 Feb
Complications of operative gynecological laparoscopy.
2003 Jan-Mar
The effects of some antibiotics on sheep lens glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro.
2003 Mar
Antibiotic activity and synergistic effect of antimicrobial peptide against pathogens from a patient with gallstones.
2004 Aug 27
Antitumor activity of common antibiotics against superficial bladder cancer.
2004 Mar
In situ investigation of drug diffusion in hydrogels by the refractive index method.
2004 May 15
Potassium permanganate-glyoxal chemiluminescence system for flow injection analysis of cephalosporin antibiotics: cefalexin, cefadroxil, and cefazolin sodium in pharmaceutical preparations.
2004 Sep 8
Effect of isoniazid on the pharmacodynamics of cefazolin-induced seizures in rats.
2005 Apr
[Sensitivity of nanoparticlized cefazolin sodium to the bacteria in vitro].
2005 Jun
Voltammetric behavior and assay of the antibiotic drug cefazolin sodium in bulk form and pharmaceutical formulation at a mercury electrode.
2005 Oct 4
Graft infectivity of rifampin and silver-bonded polyester grafts to MRSA contamination.
2005 Sep-Oct
Hypotonia during amikacin administration in a patient treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.
2006
Attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury by ascorbic acid in the canine renal transplantation.
2006 Dec
Epileptogenic activity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) antibiotics in rats.
2006 Oct
Preclinical testing of the Levitronix Ultramag pediatric cardiac assist device in a lamb model.
2007 May-Jun
[Physical and chemical characteristics of a new cefazolin sodium hydrate crystal].
2008 Aug
How do porosity-inducing techniques affect antibiotic elution from bone cement? An in vitro comparison between hydrogen peroxide and a mechanical mixer.
2008 Mar
Trends in antibacterial use in US academic health centers: 2002 to 2006.
2008 Nov 10
[Retropharyngeal abscesses: a retrospective analysis of 10 patients].
2008 Sep-Oct
[Antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic bacteria isolated from 893 children with lower respiratory infection in Guiyang].
2009 Dec
Kinetic spectrofluorimetric determination of certain cephalosporins in human plasma.
2009 Feb 15
The effects of methylprednisolone and cefazolin sodium on antioxidant status in experimentally induced maxillary sinusitis.
2009 Oct
Ectopic intrauterine device in the bladder of a pregnant woman.
2010
Periodontal regeneration capacity of equine particulate bone in canine alveolar bone defects.
2010 Oct
Investigation of the toxic functional group of cephalosporins by zebrafish embryo toxicity test.
2010 Oct
Sensitive chemiluminescence determination of thirteen cephalosporin antibiotics with luminol-copper(II) reaction.
2010 Oct
Stability of fortified cefazolin ophthalmic solutions prepared in artificial tears containing surfactant-based versus oxidant-based preservatives.
2010 Oct
Investigation of the effects of some drugs and phenolic compounds on human dihydrofolate reductase activity.
2015 Mar
Systems pharmacological analysis of drugs inducing stevens-johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
2015 May 18
Patents

Sample Use Guides

Moderate to severe infections: 500 mg to 1 gram, every 6 to 8 hours; mild infections caused by susceptible gram-positive cocci: 250 mg to 500 mg, every 8 hours; acute, uncomplicated urinary tract infections: 1 gram, every 12 hours; Pneumococcal pneumonia: 500 mg, every 12 hours; Severe, life threatening infections (e.g., endocarditis, septicemia): 1 gram to 1.5 grams, every 6 hours
Route of Administration: Other
In Vitro Use Guide
Susceptibilities of 259 isolates of pathogenic bacteria to cefazolin were measured by broth and agar dilution procedures. Beta-hemolytic streptococci were inhibited by 0.25 mug/ml, whereas Staphylococcus aureus and alphahemolytic streptococci were inhibited by 2.0 mug/ml. Enterococci were resistant to less than 32 mug/ml. Wide variation was seen with gram-negative species. Most isolates of Klebsiella species and Proteus mirabilis were inhibited by 4.0 or 8.0 mug/ml. Escherichia coli were less susceptible, and most isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia species, and Enterobacter species were resistant to 128 mug/ml.
Substance Class Chemical
Created
by admin
on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
Edited
by admin
on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
Record UNII
XLJ4VSY381
Record Status Validated (UNII)
Record Version
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Name Type Language
CEFAZOLIN SODIUM PENTAHYDRATE
Common Name English
CEFAZOLIN SODIUM HYDRATE [JAN]
Common Name English
CEFAZOLIN SODIUM PENTAHYDRATE [WHO-DD]
Common Name English
5-THIA-1-AZABICYCLO(4.2.0)OCT-2-ENE-2-CARBOXYLIC ACID, 3-(((5-METHYL-1,3,4-THIADIAZOL-2-YL)THIO)METHYL)-8-OXO-7-((2-(1H-TETRAZOL-1-YL)ACETYL)AMINO)-, SODIUM SALT, HYDRATE (1:1:5), (6R,7R)-
Common Name English
CEFAZOLIN SODIUM HYDRATE
Common Name English
Code System Code Type Description
CAS
115850-11-8
Created by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
EVMPD
SUB33474
Created by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
PUBCHEM
23678598
Created by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
FDA UNII
XLJ4VSY381
Created by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021 , Edited by admin on Sat Jun 26 09:43:59 UTC 2021
PRIMARY
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PARENT -> SALT/SOLVATE
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ACTIVE MOIETY