U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

Approval Year

Name Type Language
SOLANUM DULCAMARA STEM
WHO-DD  
Common Name English
CLIMBING NIGHTSHADE STEM
Common Name English
WOODY NIGHTSHADE STEM (SOLANUM DULCAMARA L.) [EMA HERBAL SUBSTANCE]
Common Name English
BITTER NIGHTSHADE STEM
Common Name English
EUROPEAN BITTERSWEET STEM
Common Name English
DULCAMARA [MI]
Common Name English
FELLENWORT STEM
Common Name English
SOLANUM DULCAMARA STEM [WHO-DD]
Common Name English
SOLANI DULCAMARAE STIPITES ( SOLANUM DULCAMARA L.) [EMA HERBAL SUBSTANCE]
Common Name English
DULCAMARAE STIPITES
Common Name English
WOODY NIGHTSHADE STEM
Common Name English
BITTERSWEET NIGHTSHADE STEM
Common Name English
BLUE NIGHTSHADE STEM
Common Name English
BITTERSWEET STEM
Common Name English
DULCAMARA STEM
Common Name English
Classification Tree Code System Code
EMA ASSESSMENT REPORTS SOLANUM (FINALIZED)
Created by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019 , Edited by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019
Code System Code Type Description
RXCUI
1310035
Created by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019 , Edited by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019
PRIMARY RxNorm
MERCK INDEX
M4780
Created by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019 , Edited by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019
PRIMARY Merck Index
WIKIPEDIA
Solanum dulcamara
Created by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019 , Edited by admin on Tue Oct 22 12:44:16 UTC 2019
PRIMARY The stems are approved by the German Commission E for external use as supportive therapy in chronic eczema.[8]The alkaloids, solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots) inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus.[9] Solanine and solasodine extracted from Solanum dulcamara showed antidermatophytic activity against Chrysosporium indicum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. simil. and thus may cure ringworm.[10]Although fatal human poisonings are rare, several cases have been documented. The poison is believed to be solanine.[11] Aggressive treatment of children ingesting limited amounts of ripened S. dulcamara berries appears to be unnecessary.[12]