U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

Showing 1711 - 1720 of 1957 results

Status:
US Approved Rx (1977)
Source:
BLA101094
(1977)
Source URL:
First approved in 1977
Source:
BLA101094
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER

Status:
US Approved Rx (1977)
Source:
BLA101094
(1977)
Source URL:
First approved in 1977
Source:
BLA101094
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER

Status:
US Approved Rx (1977)
Source:
BLA101094
(1977)
Source URL:
First approved in 1977
Source:
BLA101094
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER

Status:
US Approved Rx (1977)
Source:
BLA101094
(1977)
Source URL:
First approved in 1977
Source:
BLA101094
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER


Class:
POLYMER


A penicillin skin test predicts only the presence of IgE antibodies for the major or minor penicillin determinants at the time of application and does not predict the future development of IgE-mediated reactions during subsequent courses of penicillin. Benzylpenicilloyl polylysine reacts specifically with penicilloyl skin sensitizing antibodies (reagins) to produce immediate wheal and flare reactions which may reflect increased risk of allergic reactions to subsequent penicillin therapy. The use of benzylpenicilloyl polylysine can detect between 75-90% of all positive reactions to penicillin. Benzylpenicilloyl polylysine was FDA approved in 2009 for the assessment of sensitization to penicillin (benzylpenicillin or penicillin G) in those patients suspected of having a clinical hypersensitivity to penicillin.
Status:
First approved in 1964
Source:
Cuemid by Merck Sharp & Dohme
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER

Benzonatate is an antitussive that is FDA approved for the symptomatic relief of cough. It acts peripherally by anesthetizing the stretch receptors located in the respiratory passages, lungs, and pleura by dampening their activity and thereby reducing the cough reflex at its source. Common adverse reactions include nausea, oral hypoesthesia, throat symptom, numbness, dizziness, headache, sedation, somnolence. Benzonatate is chemically related to anesthetic agents of the para-amino-benzoic acid class (e.g. procaine; tetracaine) and has been associated with adverse CNS effects possibly related to a prior sensitivity to related agents or interaction with concomitant medication.
Нeparin (or Unfractionated heparin ) is an anticoagulant indicated for both the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) as well as atrial fibrillation (AF). Heparin can also be used to prevent excess coagulation during procedures such as cardiac surgery, extracorporeal circulation or dialysis, including continuous renal replacement therapy. Heparin administration can be by intravenous (or subcutaneous route. Intravenous heparin is continuously administered for therapeutic anticoagulation, while intermittent subcutaneous administration is used to prevent thromboembolism. Once administered, heparin binds reversibly to antithrombin III (ATIII) and greatly accelerates the rate at which ATIII inactivates coagulation enzymes thrombin (factor IIa) and factor Xa. The heparin-ATIII complex can also inactivate factors IX, XI, XII, and plasmin, but the antithrombotic effect of heparin is well correlated to the inhibition of factor Xa. Typical adverse effects from heparin use include bleeding, thrombocytopenia, injection site reactions, and other adverse effects only seen with chronic heparin administration. Bleeding is a major complication associated with heparin use. Patients should undergo monitoring for new bleeding that may present in the urine or stool. Bleeding may also present as bruising, petechial rash and nosebleeds.
Status:
First marketed in 1921
Source:
White Dextrin N.F.
Source URL:

Class:
POLYMER


Icodextrin is a colloid osmotic agent, derived from maltodextrin, used in form of an aqueous solution for peritoneal dialysis under the trade name Extraneal and after gynecological laparoscopic surgery for the reduction of post-surgical adhesions (fibrous bands that form between tissues and organs) under the trade name Adept. Icodextrin is a starch-derived, water-soluble glucose polymer linked by alpha (1-4) and less than 10% alpha (1-6) glucosidic bonds. Icodextrin. Icodextrin acts in the peritoneal cavity by exerting osmotic pressure across small intercellular pores resulting in transcapillary ultrafiltration throughout the dwell. Like other peritoneal dialysis solutions, Extraneal also contains electrolytes to help normalize electrolyte balance and lactate to help normalize acid-base status. Absorption of icodextrin from the peritoneal cavity follows zero-order kinetics consistent with convective transport via peritoneal lymphatic pathways. Icodextrin is metabolized by alpha-amylase into oligosaccharides with a lower degree of polymerization, including maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, and higher molecular weight species

Showing 1711 - 1720 of 1957 results