U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

Showing 1681 - 1690 of 1957 results

Oxytocin is indicated for the initiation or improvement of uterine contractions, where this is desirable and considered suitable for reasons of fetal or maternal concern, in order to achieve vaginal delivery. Oxytocin is indicated to produce uterine contractions during the third stage of labor and to control postpartum bleeding or hemorrhage. Uterine motility depends on the formation of the contractile protein actomyosin under the influence of the Ca2+- dependent phosphorylating enzyme myosin light-chain kinase. Oxytocin promotes contractions by increasing the intracellular Ca2+. Oxytocin has specific receptors in the myometrium and the receptor concentration increases greatly during pregnancy, reaching a maximum in early labor at term. The Oxytocin receptor is a typical class I G protein-coupled receptor that is primarily coupled via G(q) proteins to phospholipase C-beta. The high-affinity receptor state requires both Mg(2+) and cholesterol, which probably function as allosteric modulators. The agonist-binding region of the receptor has been characterized by mutagenesis and molecular modeling and is different from the antagonist binding site. The function and physiological regulation of the Oxytocin system is strongly steroid dependent.
Argipressin is a neurohypophysial hormone from the vasopressin hormone family. Its two primary functions are to retain water in the body and to constrict blood vessels. The antidiuretic action of Argipressin is ascribed to increase in reabsorption of water by the renal tubules. Argipressin can cause contraction of smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract, gall bladder, urinary bladder and all parts of the vascular bed, especially the capillaries, small arterioles and venules with less effect on the smooth musculature of the large veins. Agripressin for injections is used for use in diabetes insipidus, when this is not of nephrogenic origin and control of bleeding from oesophageal varices. In addition, argipressin is indicated to increase blood pressure in adults with vasodilatory shock (e.g., post-cardiotomy or sepsis) who remain hypotensive despite fluids and catecholamines.

Showing 1681 - 1690 of 1957 results